The Therapy of Experimental Drawing 

With Tom Hiscocks (BA Fine Art)

Thursday 1st & Friday 2nd February, 2018

10.00am – 5.00pm

Course fee: £240 including a light two course lunch, tea and coffee

Course outline

Tom Hiscocks will lead a two day workshop, encouraging you to find a new creative expression through drawing.

The context for the workshop will be set by discussions on what drawing is and why have we done it for centuries. We will discuss the evolution of the philosophical basis for drawing and how we evolve that to produce something from our own time and experience. We will look at the role played by our minds and emotions, both in making and responding to drawings.

The discussions will be complimented by a series of ‘experimental’ exercises to challenge how we see objects and the space they occupy. As well as developing technical skills, the workshop will develop self-awareness and understanding of why we draw. There will be extended periods throughout the two days to put your ideas into practice, and for group discussion.

This is an opportunity for you to consider and practice your individual expression through drawing with expert support and guidance.

Day 1.

The role of stillness

Why make art? A brief introduction to philosophy and art

Drawing materials – what do you need; what do you want?

Experimental practices – 3 practical sessions that challenge how we look and what we see.

Lunch

Making a drawing – choosing your approach. Get set – Go.

Drawing techniques – short cuts and tips

Thinking about tomorrow

Day 2.

The role of stillness

The tools, the surface and the size – thoughts about: Pencils; charcoal, pastels, chalk, paper and board

Experimental practices – 2 practical sessions on making a drawing

Ideas into practice – time to make a drawing.

Lunch

Ideas into practice – time to make a drawing.

Exhibiting our work – a group critique

Background reading:

Philosophy of Art. Noel Carroll. 1999. (Routledge) ISBN: 10:0-415-15964-4 (pbk)

Drawing on the right side of the brain. Betty Edwards. (2001). ISBN: 978-0-00-711645-4 (pbk)

The Practice & science of drawing. Harold Speed. (2003). ISBN: 10:0-486-22870-3 (pbk)

What you need to bring:

All drawing materials will be provided – pencils, pens, crayons, chalk, pastels, paper etc., but if you have a medium or a surface that you particularly want to experiment with please feel free to bring these with you. Otherwise just bring yourself with an open heart and an open mind.

About Tom Hiscocks:

Tom was educated at the Slade Art School summer school (2009) and the Ruskin Art School in Cambridge (2010 – 2013). He graduated from the Ruskin with a first class degree (BA Fine Art) and as winner of the Supanee Gazeley Fine Art Prize. Since then he has sold work in the UK, Europe and America, and is now represented by 4 leading galleries in the UK.

Tom is interested in the parallel experiences of constancy and change. He has a sense of constancy in his being, and yet he is always changing – learning, growing, feeling – and experiencing the same in all things. It seems to be the way of nature. He believes that all creativity comes from stillness.

His work is an attempt to reflect this essential nature of things. As well as his own practice, he has led groups of students in the UK and Europe experimenting with art – in understanding the self-made barriers to our own creative expression.

Tom lives and works in Wiltshire, UK. Some examples of his drawings appear below: